Gift Sets

Gift Sets

15 products - next page link at the bottom

Showing 1-15 of 17 item(s)

Active filters

  • Following on from the formidable Tiger I, the Tiger II featured even thicker armour as well as the powerful 88mm gun.  Making its debut on the Normandy battlefield, the King Tiger proved to be a formidable opponent although one which was mechanically fragile and very cumbersome.  The early version in this kit features the Krupp turret, of which just fifty we produced.
  • One of the most recognisable vehicles on today's roads, the MINI stands out from the crowd and has immense popularity all over Europe and beyond. They come in all colours and designs, and this, the Cooper S, is no exception.
  • Designed in the late 1930s, the Beetle was the original "Volkswagen" or "people's car". The fairly cheap, reliable small car sold well, outstripping original estimates. In 1972, the iconic Volkswagen Beetle became the "production world champion", bypassing the Ford T model, which was until that year, the most produced car. The most produced Volkswagen model is now the Golf.
  • Airfix Triumph Herald...

    Price £13.99
    The Triumph Herald, introduced in 1959, was looked upon as being quite a radical design.  Its tilt forward bonnet and unusual styling, along with all-round independent suspension were a breakaway from the traditional design theories of the era.  
  • The Hurricane was developed as a replacement for the RAFs pre-war bi-plane fighters, such as the Hawker Fury and Gloster Gauntlet. Considered revolutionary when it was unveiled in 1935, by the start of WWII the earliest versions with fabric covered wings and two bladed propellers had fallen behind the performance of the best German fighters.
  • Originally designed as a lightweight fighter, the Gnat in its two seater training form became the RAF Red Arrows' aerobatic aircraft, recognised across the world by their distinctive red livery.
  • After the fall of France in 1940, the two great air arms of the day, Great Britain's RAF and Germany's Luftwaffe, faced each other in large numbers for the first time.  The spearhead of the Luftwaffe was the Messerschmitt Bf109E.  A formidable fighting machine, it had proved itself to be world class throughout its previous campaigns.  
  • The Ford 3 litre GT was designed in late 1967 to Group 6 sports car regulations and was built to use the extremely successful Ford Cosworth 3 litre V8 engine developed for Formula 1 racing. This engine delivered over 400 b.h.p. and in the low futuristic body with its small frontal area, speeds of 200 m.p.h. could be attained. 
  • The Jaguar XKR GT3 is the racing version of the road going Jaguar XKR. Using the same engine but with much more advanced aerodynamic aids, such as the large rear wing, prominent front splitter and with much improved brakes, the racing version is able to corner at speeds far higher than its road going counterpart. 
  • Airfix Messerschmitt...

    Price £10.99
    The prototype Bf109A first flew in 1935. The later E model was more powerful and better armed and by the summer of 1940 over 500 were in service for the offensive against Great Britain. By this time, the 109E had already proved to be a competent fighter aircraft in the skies above Poland, France and the low countries.It met its match over England and was shown to be inferior to the RAFs Spitfire.
  • Armed with cannons, bombs and unguided missiles, the little A4 Skyhawks would skim across the rice paddies and hug the densely forested mountains of Vietnam in the early days of the Vietnam war of the 1960s. Against them ranged small arms fire, artillery, guided surface to air missiles and MiG’s of the North Vietnamese Air Force. Alongside the supersonic MiG-21 was the older subsonic MiG-17F. This aircraft, codenamed Fresco, was a very maneuverable opponent, and certainly a match for the Skyhawk. Between them, they formed the backbone of the air war over Vietnam.

  • RMS Titanic was an Olympic-class passenger liner owned by the White Star Lineand built at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, NI. On the night of 14 April 1912, during her maiden voyage, Titanic hit an iceberg, and sank two hours and forty minutes later, early on 15 April 1912, with the loss of 1,514 lives. She was the largest passenger steamship in the world at launch.

  • Early on the morning of June 6th 1944 the combined forces of the Allied armies landed on the Normandy beaches in Northern France in the most ambitious and important operation of the Second World War. With airborne troops already on the ground and fighting, the sea-borne element of the force began landing. This phase of the operation was codenamed Neptune and consisted of five invasion beaches, three British and Canadian (Sword, Gold and Juno) and two American beaches (Omaha and Utah). The landings themselves were preceded both by a powerful air attack and by a fierce naval artillery barrage from a vast armada of ships anchored off-shore.